Deepcool was at Computex this year with what seemed like an emphasis on cases and RGB lighting, although they did have a new CPU cooler to show off. Many of these cases seem to be updated models of previously announced cases at CES 2017, which are still pending release in the North America market.

Deepcool has made their mark on the PC hardware industry by including liquid cooling solutions in their cases. Deepcool’s Genome cases had a helical reservoir built into the front of the case. At CES 2017, Deepcool unveiled three new liquid-cooled cases, a show case, and two similar RGB fan sets.

The MF120 and MF120GT are the two new fans. The MF120GT uses a traditional housing design with the LEDs in an “X” pattern across the middle. The MF120 housing implements a frameless design with the RGB LEDs running nearly parallel through the middle. Both models share several properties: the housings are aluminum, the blades have a unique design meant to improve air pressure, they rotate on FDBs, and the fans are PWM adjustable between 500 and 2200 RPM. The plan is to sell 3 fans and a controller for $100 USD, and the system will be controlled through an Android or Apple mobile app. Unfortunately, there are no plans for a Windows desktop control app at the moment.

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Closed-loop liquid cooling (CLC) supplier Asetek has agreed to settle its ongoing patent infringement lawsuit vs. CoolIT. CoolIT, also a liquid cooling supplier, allegedly infringed upon Asetek's patents (8,240,362 & 8,245,764) that effectively lay claim to liquid pumps mounted to the CPU cooling block.

CoolIT is the most recent in a string of action imposed against Asetek's competitors, a list that includes Cooler Master and Swiftech.

Update: CoolIT has provided a statement, found below.

Computer cases are exciting up until a point -- a point of 90 degree angles. There are only so many rectangular pieces of metal you can get excited about each year. Case manufacturers change up the game to get coverage at tradeshows -- often leveraging case modders to modify existing enclosures -- but innovation occasionally shows itself.

Cooler Master showed off their HAF Stacker at PAX Prime a few years ago, reviving a decades-old concept of vertically stacking multiple systems. Alienware showed off its Area 51 case last year, a tiltable enclosure to allow easier access to the I/O panel. At CES 2014, Razer showcased "Project Christine" (either in limbo or now-defunct), a modular approach to system assembly.

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