Destiny 2 will serve as Bungie and Activision’s follow up to the first Destiny, which was exclusive to Playstation and Xbox consoles. Destiny 2 was announced as coming to PC a few months back, but few details were given at that time. Since then, on Thursday May, 18th, there was a livestream event discussing some features of the new game and showing the first official gameplay footage. If you missed the livestream, don’t worry -- we have you covered, we’ve posted the link to it and all the trailers below.

For anyone who missed the news last week, Final Fantasy XIV: Stormblood has a freshly released benchmarking tool included in the download.

In anticipation of the official release of Final Fantasy XIV: Stormblood, Square Enix has revealed a benchmark tool, and a new trailer – itself a recording of the benchmark.

Final Fantasy XIV has never exactly been a demanding title for PC hardware; however, the release of the Stormblood expansion marks the end of PS3 support, which has effectively served as the lowest common denominator while developing the MMORPG across multiple platforms. With the PS3’s hardware limitations no longer a constraint—plus an upgraded North American Data Center—Square Enix has vowed both graphical and functional advancements (think inventory space) over both A Realm Reborn and Heavensward.

Blizzard announced in January that Overwatch had surpassed the 25 million player milestone, but despite being nearly a year old, there’s still no standardized way to benchmark the game. We’ve developed our own method instead, which we’re debuting with this GPU optimization guide.

Overwatch is an unusual title for us to benchmark. As a first person shooter, the priority for many players is on sustained high framerates rather than on overall graphical quality. Although Overwatch isn’t incredibly demanding (original recommended specs were a GTX 660 or a Radeon HD 7950), users with mid-range hardware might have a hard time staying above 60FPS at the highest presets. This Overwatch GPU optimization guide is for those users, with some graphics settings explanations straight from Blizzard to GN.

Benchmarking Mass Effect: Andromeda immediately revealed a few considerations for our finalized testing. Frametimes, for instance, were markedly lower on the first test pass. The game also prides itself in casting players into a variety of environs, including ship interiors, planet surfaces of varying geometric complexity (generally simpler), and space stations with high poly density. Given all these gameplay options, we prefaced our final benchmarking with an extensive study period to research the game’s performance in various areas, then determine which area best represented the whole experience.

Our Mass Effect: Andromeda benchmark starts with definitions of settings (like framebuffer format), then goes through research, then the final benchmarks at 4K, 1440p, and 1080p.

Northgard is an unusual sidestep for Shiro Games: Moving from the genre-exploring Evoland titles to city building and real-time strategy is not the usual course, it’d seem. Shiro Games assured us that Settlers and Age of Empires were as important to them as gamers as the RPGs that inspired Evoland, and have set forth to build Northgard.

As Evoland picked the most memorable bits from the history of JRPGs, Northgard feels like it must be made of Shiro Games’ favorite bits of the 4x and RTS genres. Those familiar with Settlers will recognize the similarities in Northgard immediately, and AOE fans also have some familiar items.

Anyone who sticks to one medium for gaming -- PC, Xbox, Playstation, destroyed Switch -- inevitably misses out on some games. For us at GamersNexus, Monster Hunter has long been one of those franchises. Luckily, Phoenix Labs felt the same way, and so created a more platform-favorable co-op, behemoth-slaying RPG called “Dauntless.” Dauntless aims to bring a refreshed, new take on the hunting experience, adding a healthy dash of Dark Souls-inspired combat for the PC platform.

The very existence of humanity is being threatened by aether-fueled behemoths, we’re told, and so you shouldn’t feel bad about eradicating entire families of beasts, Design Director Chris Cleroux informed us. Just murder all of them. They’re all bad.

Mass Effect: Andromeda is set to release in North America on March 21st, while Europe is set for March 23rd arrival. With fewer than three weeks before release, BioWare/EA and nVidia have released more information about the graphics settings and options for PC, 4K screenshots using Ansel, and HDR in Mass Effect: Andromeda.

BioWare/EA recently put out the minimum and recommended system requirements for the PC version of Mass Effect: Andromeda, and nVidia followed-up with a preview of the graphical options menu. Users will be able to change and customize 16 graphical settings, including:

Mass Effect Andromeda is set to release in North America on March 21st, while Europe will see a March 23rd release date. BioWare today released their minimum and recommended PC specs, as suggested by Bioware Manager Aaryn Flynn in our Everything We Know article. We have posted a screenshot of the system requirements from the official Origin page for Mass Effect Andromeda.

According to the official Origin page, an i7-4790 or AMD FX-8350 CPU and 16GB of RAM are recommended, alongside either an nVidia GTX 1060 3GB or Radeon RX 480 4GB graphics card. This is for “high” settings at 1080p. The minimum system requirements call for an i5-3570 or AMD FX-6350 CPU and 8GB of RAM, with either an nVidia GTX 660 3GB or Radeon 7850 2GB graphics card. As for required hard drive space, users will need at least 55GB free in order to install Mass Effect Andromeda.

2017 will be home to release dates for some assuredly popular PC games, both exclusives and cross-platform. With AAA games like Resident Evil 7 (already released), Mass Effect Andromeda, and For Honor all being released within 1H17, the first half of the year is shaping up to be big for PC gaming. That said, the rest of the year seems lacking -- at least, from our current vantage point -- without much hype for anything outside of the expected annualized titles.

Today’s list of PC games for 2017 contains AAA and indie titles and their release dates, looking into the future for game launches this year.

Before even getting started here, let’s put out the obvious disclaimer. This GPU benchmark is for the beta version of For Honor, which means a few things: (1) the game’s not final yet and, despite being just two weeks away, there are still some graphics settings missing from the menu; (2) nVidia’s current drivers are optimized for the beta, but the company plans another update some point soon for further optimizations; (3) AMD has not yet released drivers for the game, though we did ask for early access and were told that the company won’t be ready until launch day. There are day-0 drivers planned from AMD.

Regardless, we tested anyway to see how the beta performs and get a baseline understanding of what we should expect overall from the new multiplayer brawler title. For Honor thus far has proven impressively detailed in geometry and texturing (especially texturing), and deserves high marks for the art department. Granted, that generally means more abuse on the video card or CPU (for the complex geometric draw calls), so we’ve got some For Honor graphics settings scaling tests as well.

This graphics card benchmark tests For Honor’s performance at 4K, 1440p, and 1080p with Extreme settings. We tested using a real, in-game benchmark rather than the built-in benchmark, which generally makes performance look a lot worse than it is in reality (we have a chart demonstrating this). Settings scaling was tested from low to extreme, as was multiplayer and ‘singleplayer’ (bot match). We primarily ran For Honor benchmarks with the AMD RX 480 8GB & 4GB, RX 470 4GB, RX 460 2GB, & 390X cards vs. the GTX 1080, 1070, 1060 6GB & 3GB, 1050 & Ti, and 970 AIB partner cards.

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