Eric Hamilton

Eric Hamilton

If you’ve missed the YouTube uploads lately, we’d recommend taking a look at the RX 6900 XT from AMD, as well as our tear-down of the Lian Li Galahad AIO. Of course, we’d be remiss not to mention that we took Cyberpunk 2077 through our GPU bench and CPU bench (and an updated CPU bench with 1.05).

Regarding news, we have some interesting commentary following hardware and component shortages and how they’re affecting segments outside of the DIY scene. Seagate has also gone the route of custom, specialized silicon to address future storage needs. We’re also seeing China’s biggest chipmaker, SMIC, added to the DoD blacklist.

There’s more to cover, of course, so find the article and video embed below.

As the end of the year approaches, things remain busy as ever with yet more GPU launches, Cyberpunk 2077 coming out, and plenty of cooler reviews. However, we’ve managed to scrape a few interesting stories together, amidst all of the end-of-year content (GN’s included).

We have the most recent Steam Hardware Survey, which continues the trend of AMD snatching up CPU market share, but getting beaten 18 times in the top 20 GPU rankings. There’s also a minor update on Nvidia’s supply woes, as it relates to the RTX 30-series drought.

We also have a bit more to go over, as you’ll find the usual article and video embed below.

It’s been another insanely busy two weeks for us here at GN, sandwiched between various product launches. Of course, this week has been anchored by the arrival of AMD’s RX 6000-series RDNA 2 GPUs. As ever, you can find our RX 6800XT and RX 6800 reviews, as well as our usual teardowns, on our YouTube channel. We’ll briefly recap them below, but you’ll need to watch the reviews for the full scope and context.

Outside of consumer GPUs, there’s also new GPUs from both AMD and Nvidia this week aimed at HPC and supercomputing. There’s also news of a new security co-processor from Microsoft, developed in collaboration with partners such as AMD, Intel, and Qualcomm. There’s also an interesting prospect of using supercomputers to help fuel progress in silicon manufacturing.

As usual, article and video embed follow below.

Hardware news this week has been busy, once again, slotting right in between silicon product releases. Our AMD Ryzen 5000 coverage is mostly done, but we're now ramping into RX 6000 GPU coverage. While preparing work for the RX 6800 XT (and subsequent) GPU launches, we opened a dialogue with NVIDIA to ask about a potential PCIe resizable BAR implementation as a counter to AMD's SAM. That's our leading story for this one, followed-up by some coverage of the Zen 3 delidding work done recently, Intel's add-in GPU for servers, and more.

At GN, we’re slowly emerging from our RTX 30-series coma, where we’ve pushed our testing and coverage perhaps as far as we ever have. We’re getting ready to slow down for a week or so to revamp and improve processes internally and get ready to do it all again with Zen 3, RDNA2, and the RTX 3070.

As ever, there’s plenty to cover outside of our reviews and testing. This week, we have news regarding NVIDIA delaying the RTX 3070 launch window to the end of October in an effort to avoid the previous RTX 3080 and 3090 catastrophe. There’s also a credible rumor suggesting that Zen 3 will come in under the Ryzen 5000-series banner, which would probably be for the best, given how convoluted CPU naming is getting. 

Elsewhere, we discuss Intel’s Omni-Path being resurrected under the new Cornelis Networks, leaked Windows XP source code, an interesting new HPE-Cray built supercomputer, and more. Check out the article and video embed below.  

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