Xmas over, we head into 2015 with Broadwell on the horizon and CES announcements just a week away. As always, we'll be posting full CES coverage of new products on-site; until that time, let's recap a few of the post-xmas sales. We found a 120GB Intel SSD, discounted Z97 & X99 motherboards, and Fractal Design cases on sale.

As a part of our new website design – pending completion before CES – we've set forth on a mission to define several aspects of GPU technology with greater specificity than we've done previously. One of these aspects is texture fill-rate (or filter rate) and the role of the TMU, or Texture Mapping Units.

When listing GPU specifications, we often enumerate the clockrate and TMU count, among other specs. These two items are directly related to one another, each used to extrapolate the “texture filter rate” of the GPU. The terms “Texture Fill-Rate” and “Texture Filter Rate” can be used interchangeably. For demonstration purposes, here is a specifications table for the GTX 980 (just because it's recent):

We're Upgrading Servers, the Website, and Our Content

By Published December 26, 2014 at 12:00 am

This is written for our more loyal, recurring readers (and you are all greatly appreciated!).

I posted a year ago that we'd have a massive mobile and front-end overhaul online in 2014. It's looking like I may be able to keep that promise. After a year of being tied-up in development hell, troubleshooting, bug fixing, and redesigns / innovation, we're approaching the end of the development cycle for our new website template. This new template will feature front-end upgrades, unseen structure updates, and will function significantly faster in loading than the present template. Similarly, the new site has spent the last few weeks getting a mobile facelift – we're trying to build a usable mobile version of the website.

Samsung and nVidia have been embroiled in a tit-for-tat legal battle for the better part of 2014, with Samsung opening a counter-suit against nVidia for patent violation. NVidia originally targeted Samsung and Qualcomm for alleged implementation of nVidia-patented GPU technology in mobile devices, demanding that Samsung devices be removed from circulation in the United States. In a counter-suit, Samsung levied its own patents against the GPU giant, making similar demands on trade restrictions.

Broadwell has missed its internally-imposed deadline numerous times now – at least twice publicly, three counting today – and has previously had its tardiness addressed. Back in May, we wrote that Intel promised Broadwell “in time for the holidays,” a period that has come and gone.

After going big on family gifts, it's not always in the funds to get things for gaming friends and clanmates; the rise of Steam, Origin, and other services have changed that. There's a huge Steam sale right now, but you can also grab games like Battlefield for $1, Dragon Age: Inquisition for 30% off, and Titanfall for $10 via EA's revamped Origin store.

We've already overviewed Steam's sales – here's what Origin's got.

This article topic stems from a recent reader email. Our inquisitive reader was curious as to the nature of variable clock speeds, primarily asking about why GPUs (specifically nVidia's) would sometimes log slower clock speeds than the overclock settings; similarly, speeds are occasionally reported higher than even what a user OC reflects.

Variable clock speeds stem from boost settings available on both AMD and nVidia architecture, but each company's version differs in execution. This brief post will focus on nVidia Boost 2.0 and why it throttles clock speeds in some environments. None of this is news at this point, but it's worth demystifying.

We've often remarked that naming structures and product branding can be a confusing space, especially when looking at things like ASUS' motherboards. Western Digital's hard drives follow a somewhat standardized branding scheme of “black is best,” then the company uses “blue,” “green,” and “red” for its other HDD options.

Today, we'll compare the WD Blue vs. WD Black and Green hard drives, then let you know which one is “best” for gaming purposes. These are the drives we're primarily looking at:

With Christmas only days away, many of us still haven't finished our shopping. No need to brave the cold to rush out into the crowds, though – we've got you covered. This week we found a case, a power supply, and three video cards that are on sale. If you're looking for a gift for someone else – or just want to treat yourself – check out the deals we found below.

'Tis the season for humiliating Sony, and it just keeps going. First, the company was hacked and embarrassed publicly with its own incompetence. Next, they were besieged by class action lawsuits against them for data breaches. Then, they announced they were pulling the movie that everyone believes is responsible for the hacks. Finally – and this is the only tidbit that I actually find interesting in any way – a previous class action lawsuit about false advertising for one of the PS4 release titles has been allowed to proceed.

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