Hardware

In gaming mice news, Thermaltake’s gaming arm, Tt eSports, this week announced the new Nemesis Swtich RGB – a MOBA/MMO gaming mouse.

The Nemesis Switch RGB uses a PMW 3360 optical sensor, topping out at 12,000 DPI, and uses 50-million click Omron switches with 12 programmable buttons for macros. On-board storage exists to permit staging for up to 5 profiles.

Following our first battery of tests, we dismantled our AMD Vega: Frontier Edition card (which we purchased retail) to get a closer look at the VRM & power design, thermal design, card assembly, and sizes for everything on the board. The tear-down process is the first step to our inevitable hybrid mod of AMD Vega, which should determine the card’s headroom with the thermal limitation removed. We’re also using this as an opportunity to report rough die size measurements, HBM stack measurements, and mounting distances for the community.

Full review testing is still forthcoming, as we didn’t have the usual pre-release embargo period to look things over, but this will serve as our first official Vega: FE coverage. Our next round of coverage will likely be a VRM analysis by Buildzoid, which will be accompanied shortly by thermal/power testing and overclock/gaming testing. Production tests will land in there somewhere – those are already half done – we just need to figure out where they fit best, based on content scheduling.

Zotac GTX 1080 Ti AMP Extreme Tear-Down

By Published June 29, 2017 at 9:14 pm

With hours to spare until our Vega shipment arrives from a retailer, we put together a review of the Zotac 1080 Ti Amp Extreme – it’s in editing now, and still pending completion – and tore-down the card. The tear-down is live now on YouTube, and is embedded below.

As for the reference to the rubber bumper not making contact, that’s shown in the above photo. Note also that this bumper isn’t over the inductors, so it’s not going to impact coil whine, and it’s not making contact to the VRM heatsink. We already tested this and have data for it in the review.

As we do each week, we’ve rounded-up the major hardware news topics for the past week of industry announcements, all headlined in today’s video. The show notes are also posted in this article, if that format is preferred.

Major news topics seem to pertain to Vega: Frontier Edition – which has had fresh hype attached to it, following a newly published preview – and special edition mining cards, with additional news covering industry topics and launches. SSD and RAM prices remain a mainstay discussion topic for us, though we’ve also got some information on a Blender update, LGA2066 cooler compatibility, SilverStone’s Strider PSUs, and G.Skill’s new memory. More below.

Our hardware news round-up for the past week is live, detailing some behind-the-scenes / early information on our thermal and power testing for the i9-7900X, the Xbox One X hardware specs, Threadripper's release date, and plenty of other news. Additional coverage includes final word on Acer's 21X Predator, Samsung's 64-layer NAND finalization, Global Foundries' 7nm FinFET for 2018, and some extras.

We anticipate a slower news week for non-Intel/non-AMD entities this week, as Intel launched X299/SKY-X and AMD is making waves with Epyc. Given the command both these companies have over consumer news, it's likely that other vendors will hold further press releases until next week.

Find the show notes below, written by Eric Hamilton, along with the embedded video.

EVGA GTX 1080 Ti Kingpin PCB & VRM Analysis

By Published June 17, 2017 at 6:16 pm

When interviewing EVGA Extreme OC Engineer “Kingpin,” the term “dailies” came up – as in daily users, or “just gamers,” or generally people who don’t use LN2 to overclock their GPU. The GTX 1080 Ti Kingpin card is not a device built for “dailies,” but rather for extreme overclockers – people who are trying to break world records.

Cards like this – the Lightning would be included – do have a reason to exist. Criticism online sometimes calls such devices “pointless” for delivering the same overall out-of-box experience as nearly any other 1080 Ti, but those criticizing aren’t looking at it from the right perspective. A Kingpin, Lightning, or other XOC card is purchased to eliminate the need to perform hard mods to get a card up to speed. It’s usable out of the box as an XOC tool.

This episode of Ask GN is our first since returning from Taiwan, where we spent nearly two weeks covering Computex and other on-sight events. In the time since, the internet erupted in questions pertaining to PCIe lanes, specifically as they relate to Intel CPUs and chipsets. We address some of those questions in this Ask GN, explain differences in CPU and PCH HSIO lanes, and then get into some other questions.

Those other questions, for the interested, are all timestamped below. One asked about whether AIB partner cards are "worth it" for their power design vs. an FE card, about repasting CPU TIM, and about coolers for new large-size CPU sockets.

Video below:

Logitech today announced its new wireless charging products for an upcoming pair of mice, the G903 and G703, which use familiar high-performance wireless hardware to the G900. The two mice (and, theoretically, subsequent mice) will use magnetic resonance rather than inductive or closed-couple charging, permitting a small form factor “under-mat” for mousepads.

The lower mat is dubbed “PowerPlay,” and emits an electromagnetic field in a radial pattern outward from the center. Used within reason – read: the mouse is probably not on the fringes of the pad for too long – the PowerPlay mat is advertised as being capable of wirelessly charging mice with an efficiency great enough to sustain ongoing use, plus some recharge. Magnetic resonance is not as efficient as induction, though neither is as efficient as just plugging the device in (which is still possible). Logitech worked to improve charge efficiency to a point that the mouse never has to be actively charged by the user, or by requiring user thought and effort, while also completely ridding of the cable. This is part of Logitech’s on-going evangelism promoting wireless mice as minimally equivalent in performance, if not objectively superior, to wired mice with regard to latency and response times. Now, though, the company has instituted a $100 mat to further entice users away from the wire.

Thermaltake was one of our many stops upon our Computex 2017 journey, where the company was showing off a very expensive prototype case, as well as a more modest pair of ATX mid-towers. On the channel, we have a video showcasing these enclosures, so be sure to check that out if video format is preferable.

Samsung is releasing a trinity of gaming displays sporting High Dynamic Range (HDR), quantum-dot composition (QLED), 144 Hz refresh rates, and curved screens.

Samsung has seemingly reserved their Quantum-Dot Technology for their high-end TVs, and we are slowly seeing more HDR enabled gaming panels suffusing across the market, with the likes of both Acer and ASUS having flagship displays with the technology. Samsung’s flagship C49HG90, along with the C27HG70 and C32HG70, denote an ambitious incursion into the high-fidelity gaming display market for Samsung.

We moderate comments on a ~24~48 hour cycle. There will be some delay after submitting a comment.

Advertisement:

  VigLink badge