This episode of Ask GN discusses review philosophy guidelines, particularly regarding marketing validation. We also talk about how overclocking can sometimes worsen frametimes, despite improving averages, and how to better cool motherboard VRM components. This last question is of note for our next upcoming content piece, tomorrow’s video, where we talk about X299 VRM thermal results.

The episode is embedded below, with timestamps below that:

This Ask GN episode discusses tube orientation on radiators & coolers (top vs. bottom orientation) and why it matters, AIO headers on motherboards (like the Crosshair Hero VI), case testing methods, and streaming PC builds.

The last question is an interesting one, and one we've pondered for a bit: As we've shown in our streaming + gaming tests on a single system, there is potential that it'd make more sense to build two separate PCs, both of lower total cost, and run one of them as a standalone capture box. This takes more room (and probably more power), but would resolve concern of frametime variability on the player side and could potentially cost less than 8700K/R7 builds. We'll look into adding this to our test methods, but for now, we tackle the question in the video: 

This episode of Ask GN was filmed a few days ago, but we ended up with so much content (like the H500P review and Vega 64 Strix PCB analysis) that we postponed its publication. The episode tackles popular topics of thermals and thermal testing, which have recently received more public interest, and also covers some top-level discussion of power, thermals, and electricity.

We spend most of the time discussing motherboard differences -- a story we've been harping on since January -- and how different board voltages affect CPUs in different ways. The rest of the intro is spent explaining thermal testing difficulties and challenges, and how we can best normalize for those in review content. The timestamps are below the video embed:

This is our first Ask GN in a few weeks, with the gap between being filled with travel and other projects (as has been indicated by recent uploads, many of those include case reviews). For this week’s Ask GN, we’re addressing questions of how important CLC pump speed is, auto-overclocking and its annoyances, pump whine elimination, personal case preferences, and open loop cooler limitations.

As always, the timestamps have been dropped below the video.

This episode of Ask GN is the last of our GamersNexus content from the combined PAX West & Whistler trip (with other videos still uploading to the GNSteve side-channel). Episode 58 is something of a special episode, having been shot in the “Peak 2 Peak” Gondola, and provided a unique time trials element to answering the questions.

We tackle topics of memory bandwidth (“what is memory bandwidth?”), Vega voltage validation and undervoltage issues, and daisy chained PCIe cable topics.

Episode below:

Ask GN serves as a consistent format in our video series, now 57 episodes strong. We are still filming at a pace of roughly one Ask GN episode every 1-2 weeks, so if you’ve got questions, be sure to submit them in the YT comments section.

This week’s episode gives a brief break from the deeper overclocking, undervolting, and benchmarking topics of late. We briefly visit Pascal temperature response observations, a user’s chipped GPU (and our own tech battle scars), and talk monitor overclocking. The article referenced during the monitor OC section can be found here.

This episode of Ask GN (#56) revisits the topic of AMD's Temperature Control (TCTL) offset on Ryzen CPUs, aiming to help demystify why the company has elected to implement the feature on its consumer-grade CPUs. The topic was resurrected with thanks to Threadripper's imminent launch, just hours away, as the new TR CPUs also include a 27C TCTL offset. Alongside this, we talk Threadripper CPU die layout diagrams and our use of dry erase marker (yes, really), sensationalism and clickbait on YouTube, Peltier coolers, Ivy Bridge, and more.

For a separate update on what's going on behind the scenes, our Patreon backers may be happy to hear that we've just posted an update on the Patreon page. The update discusses major impending changes to our CPU testing procedure, as Threadripper's launch will be the last major CPU we cover for a little while. Well, a few weeks, at least. That'll give us some time to rework our testing for next year, as our methods tend to remain in place for about a year at a time.

Timestamps below.

Ask GN returns for its 54th episode – we’ve gotten more consistent than ever – to discuss Noctua fan manufacturing locations (China & Taiwan), thermal pads vs. thermal paste usage on MOSFETs, Vega 10-bit support, and a couple other items.

A few of the items from this week peer into GN’s behind-the-scenes workings, as several viewers and readers have been curious about our staff, whether we keep products, or why we “waste” GPUs by using them for things other than mining.

As always, timestamps below the embed.

This episode of Ask GN returns with our new format, frontloading the episode with some discussion topics before feeding into the user-submitted questions. As always, for consideration in next episode, please leave your comment on the YouTube playback page or in our Ask GN Discord channel for Patreon backers.

The video opens with another “gift” from NZXT, some new power draw testing, AMD Vega naming thoughts (and rushed launches with Intel & AMD), and then addresses user questions. We hop around from liquid metal to CPU and airflow topics, giving a good spread to this episode.

Watch below – timestamps below the embedded video:

This episode of Ask GN posts on the tail of the X299 and Kaby Lake X / Skylake X embargo lift and in the midst of the newest cryptocurrency craze, which has set upon the video card market like a swarm of locusts.

We’re addressing two general questions we’ve seen around the internet, then following-up with reader/viewer-submitted questions. If you’d like to pose a question for the next Ask GN, the best place to do so would be in either our Patreon discord or in the video comments.

Timestamps below.

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