German manufacturer Be Quiet! has released its latest line of ultra-quiet fans – the SilentWings 3, first found in the Dark Base 900 that we saw at Computex. Be Quiet! is a company whose name backs most product roll-outs, as representative Christoph Katzer explained to us. The company focuses heavily on build quality and silence, and the new SilentWings 3 fans have been redesigned with fluid-dynamic bearings, now using brass cores and seven blades that have a funnel-shaped design. The frame is rubberized to enable a reported near-inaudible sound level – according to Be Quiet!, the 120mm model produces 16.4 decibels and the 140mm model 15.5 decibels. To put that into perspective, someone whispering is about 30 decibels. The rubberized design also reduces vibration levels to further mitigate noise.

We looked at Be Quiet!'s Dark Base 900 PC case at Computex and were impressed. The SilentWings 3 fans debuted in the DB900, about 3 months prior to launch individually, so owners of the DB900 are already equipped with the new fans.

Vendor Battles are our newest form of lighthearted, fun, but informational content. We conducted our first Vendor Battle at PAX East 2016, starring EVGA, MSI, and PNY. Now, at Computex, we turned to the case manufacturers: “You have one minute. Tell me why I should buy your case and not the next manufacturer's.”

It was a fun battle, particularly because all the case teams seem to know each other. George Makris of Corsair opened, followed by Shannon Robb of Thermaltake, and then Christoph Katzer of Be Quiet! All three well-known companies in the space.

Here's the showdown video – direct quotes below.

We had to invent a word for this one. The new Be Quiet! Dark Base 900 is an “invert-able” case on display at Computex, offering modularity for users to completely disassemble the insides. The drive cages, optical drives (removable), and even the motherboard tray can be removed and shuffled around, offering an inverted motherboard layout (similar to what we reviewed here), standard layout, or removal of unwanted drive cages / optical drive bays.

The modularity of the case is almost entirely for personal preference, and will offer minimal performance difference (if any at all). We did see that the 600C performed well in its configuration, but that was less a result of the tray inversion and more a result of the fan and PSU fan positioning, which we talk about in that review. The entire center of the chassis & frame can be removed and re-oriented with the help of 9 screws, and the side-agnostic paneling allows for the window to be positioned on either side of the pro model. The non-pro model can still do all this motherboard inversion, but includes a normal steel side panel with sound damping materials, as opposed to the tempered glass.

Be Quiet! has been in the air cooling and power supply business for more than a decade, dating back to a 2002 origin. At CES 2016, the German company didn't have any ground-breaking new technology or designs, but did share some information about what may be coming soon.

This Computex, Be Quiet doesn’t appear to be jumping into any new markets, but rather improving their current case, fan, cooler, and power supply product lines.

We reported on the Silent Base 800 back in November when Be Quiet! posted its specs, then later revisited the case at CES 2015. Over the past few weeks, we finally had the opportunity to try out the Silent Base 800 for ourselves. It’s pretty clear what its purpose is (silent, “be quiet,” etc.), but the question remains whether the case will fit the niche well enough to merit its price.

Be Quiet!’s name is a bit interesting: An English name was chosen by a German company, and said name is in fact an exclamatory command to stop making any noise. The imaginative part of me likes to believe that Be Quiet! simply yells at coolers instead of performing R&D; regardless of how Be Quiet! develops coolers, they have a growing range of options at different performances, sizes, and prices. Most recently, Be Quiet! announced their newest CPU cooler -- the Shadow Rock LP.

German case, cooler, & PSU manufacturer "Be Quiet!" made an appearance at CES this week, where they spotlighted two new air coolers and the Silent Base 800 enclosure we previously wrote about.

Be Quiet! expanded its cooler line with the Dark Rock TF -- a black monolith with two top-down fans -- and the Shadow Rock LP. The Dark Rock TF (TF initializes "Top Flow" air direction, or top-down) is the larger, more powerful cooler rated for 220W TDP. It sports six nickel-plated copper pipes with a two-tiered aluminum fin design. The CPU block is not direct contact, but does appear solid and well-machined with its smooth coldplate.

bequiet-silent800-1

CPU cooling and PSU manufacturer Be Quiet! has just announced its first high-end enclosure, the “Silent Base 800.” The company indicated to press earlier this year that it had plans to enter the enclosure market prior to the 2014 holidays, and it looks like that target date was hit.

The Silent Base 800 enclosure is advertised as offering “the perfect symbiosis of noise prevention and cooling performance,” which in non-marketing speak translates to “noise damped and ventillated.”

Today, be quiet!, Germany’s top PSU manufacturer, announced that they are entering the lower-end CPU cooler market with their new Pure Rock cooler. This compact CPU cooler (only 155x121x87.5 mm) uses 4x6mm copper heatpipes to join the cold plate to the cooling fins and 120mm Pure Wings 2 fan. According to their internal testing, this fan, using 9 high-air flow blades (for low noise), only generates 26.8 decibels even under its full 1500 RPM load.

bq-pure-rock

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