Using horizontal motherboard installation, Lian-Li’s new PC-V33 enclosure is capable of supporting ATX boards with full-length video cards and PSUs. The new PC-V33 uses a compartmentalized design, sliced horizontally, to conceal the PSU and drives below the core components.

The PC-V33 case is measured at 334 x 352 x 390mm (13 x 13.9 x 15.3 in), so it’s not as tiny as an mITX case, but it’s fairly small for the ATX inclusion.

Thermaltake is a prominent case and peripheral brand. This year, they’re holding what they call “the international modding event of the year.” The “2015 Thermaltake Case MOD Invitational Season 2” may not have the most catchy name, but it is a competition for the world’s top case modders from the US, Canada, UK, France, Germany, Australia, Russia, Thailand, and the Philippines to transform the Thermaltake Core X9 case with Thermaltake liquid cooling equipment.

With the popular release of the NZXT H440, Razer and NZXT previously teamed-up to ship an H440 case with Razer’s color, style, and logo. This was a bit of surprise as Razer really hadn’t had designs partners like this before. As of yesterday, it appears that NZXT and Razer will continue to release NZXT cases with slightly altered designs and styles.

The latest case that Razer and NZXT collaborated on is the “S340 - Designed by Razer.” Yes, that is its name; not exactly very catchy, if you ask me, but no one did. Regardless of name, the new S340 (which we will call the Razer S340) is the same as the NZXT S340, but with some color and logo tweaks. The design is almost exactly the same – it is a good design after all – so our review of the NZXT S340 is perfectly relevant for the Razer S340. To recap that review, the NZXT S340 is a minimalist, (almost) entirely metal ATX case, without any front 5.25” bays. It includes a PSU shroud and cable management bar that allow for cable management without the use of grommets. The S340 has good watercooling support, with a 280mm radiator being mountable in the front. It also includes dust filters for the fan intakes.

Relative case and cooling newcomer Phanteks today announced its Enthoo Evolv ITX SE case. The Enthoo Evolv ITX case hosts mini-ITX motherboards in a 230 x 375 x 395mm enclosure. The SE version – Special Edition – is delivered in two new color combinations: Red/black and white/black.

Enermax, LEPA, and Ecomaster are all confusingly tied together in a web of brands and companies, but they can be effectively thought of as a single entity. We were recently offered the new LEPA “Lenyx” case for review, a $160 E-ATX full-tower unit that uses a rubberized paint aesthetic.

In response to the offer, I warned the company that I may dislike the case based on an initial product overview. From my quick preview, I advised, it looked as if the case made heavy use of plastics, something I've grown to dislike over the years. The Enermax representative assured me that the photos didn't do the enclosure justice, emphasizing the high-quality application of rubberized paint and again offering the unit for review. I accepted.

This review of the LEPA Lenyx full-tower looks at ease-of-installation, build quality, aesthetics, extras, and thermal performance in benchmarking. We'll also go over cable management and design strategy. The LEPA 801 Lenyx case has an MSRP of $160 and is presently sold at $171 via Amazon.

We’re presently out in the general “California area” – a large, confusing land filled with cars and empty water basins. Consequently, this land also contains hardware manufacturers and system integrators. The trip started with a visit to Kingston, bridged to NZXT, EVGA, iBUYPOWER, CyberPower, and (the lone game developer) Chris Roberts’ Cloud Imperium Games. All that content is forthcoming – but we’re starting with iBUYPOWER.

High-end case manufacturer Lian-Li today announced its PC-O8 enclosure, a case the company advertises as “dual-compartment.”

This Computex, Be Quiet doesn’t appear to be jumping into any new markets, but rather improving their current case, fan, cooler, and power supply product lines.

PC cases are most simply a box. Sometimes, they’re expensive boxes. Yet throughout the years, we have seen cases transform from being “just a box” with a couple added features to being incredibly polished and feature-rich cases, putting enclosures from a more beige era to shame.

Despite the simple concept of a case, PC case manufacturers have continued to add new and creative features that make their cases more than “just a box.” Phanteks is a fairly well-known name in fans and CPU coolers, but as of late, their new Enthoo case line has generated interest in the PC building community.

At the beginning of working on this case round-up, these three selections – the NZXT S340, Antec P70, and Zalman R1 – were all about $60 to $70 max. The price range was perfect, and the cases made for currently-marketed solutions that users may encounter. Over the week that we've worked on the round-up, things have changed a bit: Zalman's R1 and Antec's P70 now sit at $40 after a $20 rebates, shifting the price range to be unintentionally wider. The base price is still $60 for both cases.

These are the three cases we're looking at today:

In this gaming case round-up, we review the performance and build quality of NZXT's S340, Zalman's R1, and Antec's P70, hoping to narrow the selection of budget gaming cases. There are dozens of similarly-priced chassis out there and this is far from a comprehensive list, but it's our start on producing regular component round-ups as a means to more easily compare products for our readers. We'll work on more comparisons shortly following.

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