The Destiny 2 beta’s arrival on PC provides a new benchmarking opportunity for GPUs and CPUs, and will allow us to plot performance uplift once the final game ships. Aside from being a popular beta, we also want to know if Bungie, AMD, and nVidia work to further improve performance in the final stretch of time prior to the official October 24 launch date. For now, we’re conducting an exploratory benchmark of multiplayer versus campaign test patterns for Destiny 2, quality settings, and multiple resolutions.

A few notes before beginning: This is beta, first off, and everything is subject to change. We’re ultimately testing this as it pertains to the beta, but using that experience to learn more about how Destiny 2 behaves so that we’re not surprised on its release. Some of this testing is to learn about settings impact to performance (including some unique behavior between “High” and “Highest”), multiplayer vs. campaign performance, and level performance. Note also that drivers will iterate and, although nVidia and AMD both recommended their respective drivers for this test (385.41, 17.8.2), likely change for final release. AMD in particular is in need of a more Destiny-specific driver, based on our testing, so keep in mind that performance metrics are in flux for the final launch.

Note also: Our Destiny 2 CPU benchmark will be up not long after this content piece. Keep an eye out for that one.

Destiny 2 will serve as Bungie and Activision’s follow up to the first Destiny, which was exclusive to Playstation and Xbox consoles. Destiny 2 was announced as coming to PC a few months back, but few details were given at that time. Since then, on Thursday May, 18th, there was a livestream event discussing some features of the new game and showing the first official gameplay footage. If you missed the livestream, don’t worry -- we have you covered, we’ve posted the link to it and all the trailers below.

Activision CEO Bobby Kotick recently announced that the publisher allotted Bungie $500 million to make their next game, Destiny. To put this into perspective, Watch Dogs had a budget of $68 million, Battlefield 4 had a budget of nearly $100 million, and Grand Theft Auto V’s budget was a staggering $265 million. But if we’re using these games as examples, maybe Destiny’s $500 million budget starts to seems reasonable; after all, Watch Dogs is plagued by bugs, amongst its other substantial problems and Battlefield 4 has little to show for all the money spent on it. Meanwhile, Grand Theft Auto V’s previously massive-looking-budget earned the game a tremendous $1 billion in sales and -- compared to the other two -- it actually works! Money, then, surely must solve all problems.

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