Chivalry: Medieval Warfare” is the de facto representation of “first-person slashers” in the gaming market, rooted in the years-old Age of Chivalry Source Engine mod. It's a gruesome, unforgiving deathmatch in red-vs-blue style with more historically accurate weaponry, removing the fantasy expectation that usually accompanies medieval-era games.

Overpower does this differently; the indie arena game feels like Team Fortress 2, but deals in warriors, mages, assassins, and rangers, using more playful stylings and mechanics than might be found in a game like Chivalry. This makes Overpower uniquely positioned to appeal to “arena shooter” fans who'd like a change of pace, mixing in some MMO PVP arena mechanics and classes.

Today Ubisoft announced open beta dates for their upcoming MMO shooter Tom Clancy’s The Division. The open beta will take place between February 19th and the 21st on PC and consoles. The open beta beta will feature a new mission in addition to the content from the prior closed beta, and Ubisoft has indicated that those playing the open beta get “a special reward” unlocked in the full game on release. Accompanying this announcement is a trailer teasing some of the new content, seen below.

The trouble with slapping “MOBA” onto games is that the genre is associated instantly with the likes of DOTA and LoL. But there's also not a great, succinct way to describe a certain class of “FPS-styled multiplayer arenas with MMO PVP combat” (FMAMP does have a ring to it, though) and so “MOBA-inspired” ends up getting tagged on such games.

Overpower is one of those “MOBA-inspired” games, but it's more relatable to Counter-Strike and Unreal Tournament than a proper MOBA. The game builds around the concept of fast, fun combat with an over-the-shoulder view of staple fantasy RPG characters – your usual gamut of rangers, warriors, mages, and assassins. Chivalry is the closest, current game we could come up with that matches Overpower's mechanical goals, but there are still distinct differences between these two titles.

Steam has long been rife with first-person survival -- from DayZ to Rust to The Forest to, to, to -- there’s enough to fill the biggest house voxels can build. To cut through the melange, Teotl Studios gave upcoming title “The Solus Project” a twist: it’s linear, not open-world. The plot to The Solus Project will be familiar to anyone who's been watching sci-fi movies over the last couple years. The protagonist is on a ship carrying the last remnants of humankind, eventually downed when the ship crash-lands on an alien planet. The protagonist is the only surviving crewmember of the crash and, of course, it’s up to them save what’s left of the human race.

A dozen hours of Black Ops 3 testing completed and we're moving to the next sequentially-incremented video game: Fallout 4. It's got a bigger number at the end.

Bethesda has one of the longest development life cycles in the industry, but the company's games are also among – arguably – the longest lasting, thanks to the undying efforts of modders. It helps that the modding community is able to fill gaps in Bethesda's code or build entirely new games from the strong foundation set forth by the veteran RPG team.

Our Fallout 4 game review & gameplay analysis is live on the homepage already, if that's what you're looking for. This post looks exclusively and in depth at Fallout 4's graphics settings and performance on PC. The below Fallout 4 PC benchmark tests FPS performance across nVidia and AMD GPUs, including the GTX 750 Ti, 960, 970, 270X, 285, 390X, and many more. VRAM and memory consumption is also looked at loosely below, hopefully establishing a baseline for the best video cards for Fallout 4 on PC.

Because mod tools don't yet exist – and certainly no mods did during our pre-release testing – we are not accounting for the inevitable performance hit created by future graphics mods.

Update: Volumetric lighting benchmark now live.

Living up to the rolling hype-ball generated by Fallout 4 seems nearly impossible. After reminiscing about Fallout 3 for years, living through false rumors, and the non-stop recent postings pertaining to Bethesda’s latest game, expectations are at an all-time high.

Fallout 4 is the much-anticipated continuation of the Fallout series. The first-person shooter, role-playing game is based in a futuristic world similar to our own, but diverging on a timeline wrought with nuclear war.

The newest game in the series is set in Commonwealth of Massachusetts -- Boston, specifically. Fallout 4 has been in development since the release of Fallout 3, a late 2008 launch, and uses the same engine as Skyrim. The basic storyline (note: this only covers the very beginning and initial storyline setup, nothing more) behind Fallout 4 is that a family is cryogenically frozen in Vault 111, after getting in just as the nuclear bombs go off. We’re then awoken, and see our child being taken by two unknown NPCs who’ve just killed our significant other. After waking up again, we discover that we’re the only one left alive in Vault 111. So begins the game, setting forth on a journey to find a child.

Now that the background is established, let’s cover some of the features Bethesda did well on: settlement building, FPS mechanics, weapon and armor modding, and game atmosphere. We’ll later visit subpar performance for average graphics and irritating bugs.

FPS games are shrouded in arcane mythology pertaining to the accuracy of mouse input, with never-ending debates over acceleration, smoothing, mouse input filtering, and raw input detection. Call of Duty: Black Ops III doesn't escape from this.

One of the first questions we encountered upon publication of our Black Ops III benchmark related to mouse smoothing and acceleration. Namely, “how do I get rid of it?” 

This is one of those “announcements of an announcement” – there's almost no information available at present aside from the fact that “Paragon” exists. That, and a trailer (below).

Epic Games released the below teaser trailer and Play Paragon website earlier today, indicating a 2016 release target for the enigmatic title. From a first glance, it looks as if Paragon is either a team shooter or a MOBA, strictly based on the fact that (1) it's got guns and (2) the characters are being called Heroes.

The video game industry's news output is churning in full capacity as November nears. Our contacts and colleagues in the industry are almost ubiquitously undergoing crunch right now, working longer hours to finalize that last bit of content before “going Gold.” That means a lot of news, so we've decided to start rounding-up weekly game news at the end of the week.

This week, the items to watch have been No Man's Sky for its “I've Seen Things” trailer (and release date), Star Citizen for an updated flight model, GOG's introduction of ancient RPGs to its service, Overwatch beta, and Fallout 4's mod support.

Full news coverage in the video, though I've also posted the script below:

Space games have made a bit of a dent in the industry lately. Between Star Citizen, Elite: Dangerous, Rebel Galaxy, Dreadnought, and others, we’ve seen the industry trend shift toward a revisit to one of the oldest genres. Dreadnought takes a different approach from its space sim counterparts, focusing instead on more FPS-styled obliteration of opposing teams.

We’ve previewed Dreadnought twice now. The first time – PAX South – the game had little competition in the way of other on-site booths, easily ranking it among the best games at the show. We then saw Dreadnought at PAX East about six months ago, where we reported on team elimination gameplay (see: Counter-Strike in space) and remarked that the game had gotten steadily better. That trend hasn’t stopped. Our PAX 2015 hands-on with Dreadnought reveals more gameplay, customization mechanics, and monetization avenues.

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