As soon as the electrical contacts of a switch are joined from a switch depression, an electrical signal is dispatched within the mouse for processing by its internal components. That initial queue of processing helps rule-out potential spurious behavior, electromagnetic interference (or cross-talk), and performs any necessary calculations for the input command. If deemed an intentional user action, that input is sent down the USB cable (or transmitted wirelessly) to the system.

We discussed this process in our Logitech G900 Chaos Spectrum review. There's a misconception with users that wireless input devices are inherently slower than their wired counterparts, when the reality is that the opposite can be true – and is, with the G900 and G403 wireless. The recent PAX West 2016 event gave us an opportunity to get hands-on with the company's USB analyzer setup to demystify some of the wireless vs. wired mouse arguments.

Logitech's PAX Prime presence initializes with the launch of its “Prodigy” line of gaming peripherals, each attempting to expropriate the $70 market with gamer-not-gamer hardware. From our hands-on with the new line, it looks as if Logitech's goal is primarily to fulfill the demand of high-end gaming components without the Transformers-esque appendages and plastic wings. This follows the company's still recent Logitech G Pro release (not to be confused with the Logitech Pro-G), another $70 peripheral, but targeted more specifically at eSports players.

We've not yet had enough hands-on time to fully review the new Logitech hardware, but we do have the specs and some initial notes.

The Prodigy components announced today include the G213 non-mechanical keyboard, G231 gaming headset with a familiar body, and G403 gaming mouse. All three devices hit the same $70 price point, with the mouse including an outlier $100 wireless alternative.

Logitech's new Chaos Spectrum G900 mouse has definitively settled the wireless gaming mouse debate: Wireless mice can respond just as fast – if not faster – as their wired counterparts. This topic is one we've explored in-depth below, including discussion on wireless interference and cross-talk/impedance, battery life and weight trade-offs, accuracy, and more.

The Chaos Spectrum G900 was unveiled at GDC as a “wired-wireless” mouse, embodying Logitech's devout effort to demystify wireless mice as “unreliable” for gaming. Logitech informed us that their wireless G900 tested as performing minimally equal to wired competition for responsiveness, and sometimes better.

The new G900 RGB mouse costs $150, making it one of the most expensive gaming-class mice currently on the market. It also makes some of the biggest promises, like 24-hour run-to-die battery life (with RGB LEDs on) and exceedingly tight tolerances for click force variance from mouse-to-mouse. It's a uniquely high-end peripheral that requires a properly in-depth review. Starting us off, the usual specs sheets:

In a hands-on demonstration at GDC 2016, Logitech showcased its newest G900 Chaos Spectrum “wired-wireless” gaming mouse. We've got the unit in-hand and are running extensive battery life testing prior to publication, but for today, we're covering initial specs, wireless range, and engineering. The below interview hosts Chris Pate, Logitech's Gaming Portfolio Manager, who speaks to testing, engineering, range and accuracy of wireless mice, and wireless mouse misconceptions.

The goal with the $150 G900 Chaos Spectrum mouse (the “spectrum” means “RGB,” in Logitech's branding) was to create a high-precision wireless mouse that's ready to be taken on tournament weekends, without charge. The unit can extract an advertised ~32 hours from its battery under the right conditions – namely disabling the lights – or about 24 hours of gaming use when running the LEDs. A braided cable is provided for charging or wired use (“wired-wireless”) and the mouse can charge while being used with the cable.

Memory manufacturer gone-rogue Corsair today released an update to its peripheral lineup – alongside SFX PSU updates, which we'll post separately – in the form of a $50 RGB mouse. The newest Sabre mouse is emblazoned with a mask of Corsair's new “sails” logo, behind which rests one of the four RGB LEDs; the other three are located within the scroll wheel, front-side grill, and left-side thumb position.

Riding the tide of the growing eSports trend, hardware manufacturer Cougar recently announced its updated 700M gaming mouse. The mouse is a refreshed 700M – released in 2014 – and has been given a fresh coat of paint under the company's “eSports” branding initiative. The company advertises tactility as a primary selling point of the 700M, which uses the somewhat ubiquitous Avago ADNS-9800 sensor.

The RGM-1100 is Rosewill’s latest mouse at $40, a successor to the RGM-1000 that we previously reviewed. The RGM-1100 is prominently marketed towards gamers in looks, packaging, and features. It is also an example of the market surge to implement RGB (or at least multi-color) lighting in everything possible -- headsets now included.

While the RGM-1100 doesn’t support 16.8 million colors or have a multitude of macro keys, it does have multi-color lighting, configurable settings, and adjustable weight.

This review of Rosewill's new RGM-1100 gaming mouse looks at endurance, button layout, sensor and acceleration specs, and value.

“There's a lot of arcane voodoo magic around gaming mice,” Logitech Product Manager Chris Pate told us in a discussion on gaming mouse hardware. Joined by Logitech, we discussed mouse acceleration, smoothing, the interpretation of 2D input into a 3D gaming space, mouse myths, and mouse sensor technology in our latest video.

Just weeks ago, our Corsair tour privileged us to highly-sensitive information that was placed under embargo until further notice. Today, Corsair lifted the embargo on their new M63MM RGB Mechanical Gaming Mouse, a device equipped with the company's patent-pending BIG ball-mouse technology.

Nearing the height of GDC 2015 and leading into PAX East, peripherals manufacturer Logitech announced the release of its new high-end, lightweight gaming mouse. The Logitech G303 Daedalus Apex ($70) mouse uses the same chassis as the G302 Daedalus Prime – a mouse targeted at MOBAs – and retains a more simplistic core featureset while driving focus on a high-precision sensor.

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