This year’s CES saw content expansion for us, adding a second video producer to the road crew. This allowed us to better split article/video load, and balance sleep marginally better with work – up to 5 hours average for everyone, rather than the usual sub-5.

Anyway, there were plenty of products we covered in video format that didn’t make it into articles, and that was entirely due to physical limitations of the time-space continuum. We wanted to bring reader attention to some of the must-watch videos from the show, including our coverage of the Lian Li O11 chassis (the best case we saw at the event), the SilverStone Micro-STX form factor case, and Enermax’s updated Saberay.

Here they are:

Lian Li is known more for unusual cases -- enclosures shaped like yachts, trains, or desks -- rather than more practical everyday midtowers, but the new Alpha 550 ($190-$220) and Alpha 330 ($100) cases may change that. This is our second attempt at reviewing the Alpha: the first review sample came with no side panel and a box of free diamonds, courtesy of the shipping service. We’re reviewing the second one today, a shiny new Alpha 550X, and will be looking at thermals, noise, and build quality, with comparisons to the Alpha 330.

This year’s Computex featured the usual mix of concept and prototype cases, some of which will never make it to market (or some which will be several thousand dollars, like the WinBot). We particularly liked the “Wheel of Star” mod at Cooler Master, the “Floating” from In Win, Level 20 from Thermaltake, and Concept Slate from Corsair – but none of those are really meant to be bought in large quantities. This round-up looks at the best cases of Computex that are in the category of being purchasable, keeping cost below $400. We’ll be looking primarily at ATX form factor cases, with one Micro-STX co-star, with a few “needs work” members in the mix.

This case round-up won’t include everything we saw at the show and will exclude the more exotic cases, like the Concept Slate and the In Win WinBot, but still has plenty to get through. Before getting started, here’s a list of the relevant coverage of individual products and booths that are discussed herein:

This week's news recap segment features updates from the Super Computing conference 2016, including updates to AMD's GPUOpen and Boltzmann initiatives (ROCm, HIP), an Intel Xeon refresh, and Intel's investment in self-driving cars. Outside of SC16, we also have news pertaining to Lian-Li's (finally) shipping PC-O10 case and Thermalright's AXP-100H Muscle cooler.

The only rumor in this news segment is that of AMD's Summit Ridge naming scheme, which Chip Hell suggested will be branded with numerical 3-5-7 suffixes, similar to Intel's CPU branding. Beyond an allegedly leaked slide, there's no way to validate this rumor -- so take it for what it's worth. It's likely that we'll find out more about Zen at the time of CES, or shortly thereafter. That tends to be when Intel and AMD make some CPU / architecture announcements.

Video below:

The prototype of Lian Li’s PC-O10 was covered in our Computex 2016 content, and then seemingly vanished. Until now.

The PC-O10 features a binal design composed of two chambers aimed at isolating heat generating components, comparable in form to other models like the PC-O8 and PC-O9. The PC-O10 exhibits a striking resemblance to the PC-Q37, so much so that the *-O10 appears to be a larger, more rectangular version aimed at accommodating the ATX form factor motherboard. Motherboard support is broad, with Micro-ATX, ATX, and E-ATX all being able to fit in the chassis.

 

We've made it a habit to cover the best gaming cases at every CES show for a few years now, but our (first ever) visit to Computex has revealed something: Computex is a huge show for PC hardware; bigger than CES, in many ways, and that includes new case unveils.

Following our coverage for Computex 2016, this gaming case round-up highlights some of the best PC towers of the year. Several of these cases aren't yet on sale – and some may never be – but the majority of manufacturers are targeting a 2H16 launch for their enclosures. For this best cases of Computex 2016 round-up, we look at SilverStone, Lian-Li, In-Win, Be Quiet!, Corsair, Thermaltake, and Rosewill. Other manufacturers were present in droves – Nanoxia, Cooler Master, Deep Cool, and others – but these were the stand-out cases of booths we visited.

No particular order to the below listing. "HM" stands for "Honorable Mention."

Lian-Li has announced the PC-X510, a case they claim can fit a "full-tower build in mid-tower size."

Thanks to the arrangement of its three internal compartments, the Lian-Li PC-X510 can fit full-sized components into a relatively small footprint. A separate chamber on top of the case holds HDDs and SSDs, shortening the front of the case and making it distinctively tall and skinny (no, the picture isn't stretched – we thought so, too).

Using horizontal motherboard installation, Lian-Li’s new PC-V33 enclosure is capable of supporting ATX boards with full-length video cards and PSUs. The new PC-V33 uses a compartmentalized design, sliced horizontally, to conceal the PSU and drives below the core components.

The PC-V33 case is measured at 334 x 352 x 390mm (13 x 13.9 x 15.3 in), so it’s not as tiny as an mITX case, but it’s fairly small for the ATX inclusion.

High-end case manufacturer Lian-Li today announced its PC-O8 enclosure, a case the company advertises as “dual-compartment.”

Lian-Li is best known for its focus on all-aluminum, high-quality cases that tend to be priced prohibitively for most system builders. Those who can afford the luxury this time around will find themselves capable of building a server-class rig.

v2130-main

The PC-V2130 -- priced at just $570 for a windowed option, $500 normally -- can fit ten expansion cards, eighteen total 3.5"/2.5" drives, three 280mm radiators, a 360mm GPU (480mm with drive cages removed), and 180mm high CPU coolers. A 200mm PSU is also compatible with the case, so you can truly go server-class with this setup (and probably should, at that price).

At 237 x 640 x 625mm (9.3" x 25.2" x 24.6"), the case could also house a small child or dog.

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