Shortly after Game24 and the GTX 980 unveil (fully benchmarked here), we visited the likes of NZXT, HyperX (Kingston), CyberPower, and others to learn more about the inner-workings of the industry. This is something we're making a habit of, including previous tours of nVidia's phenomenally expensive silicon failure analysis lab and Kingston's SMT line, where we showed how RAM & SSDs are made.

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We found a fairly high-end system in the CyberPowerPC meeting room that was begging for video coverage. The unit used a modified version of NZXT's S340 enclosure, through the window of which we spotted nVidia's new GTX 980. As for the processor, the custom-built rig was running on Intel's Devil's Canyon 4790K CPU overclocked about 10% (it's capable of more, but would require fine tuning due to thermal constraints). The CPU was topped-off with NZXT's X61 that we've previously spoken about – a 280mm CLC powered by Asetek, staking variable pump speed as its claim to fame – and the host platform was Gigabyte's SOC Force Z97 overclocking motherboard. A full 32GB of HyperX Fury memory (clocked at 1866MHz natively and easily overclocked) was found slotted into the board. We previously reviewed HyperX Fury over here.

Most of the tech industry’s major players are located somewhere in California – a state that has, in our experience, proven to be very large and very saturated with horrifyingly bad drivers. It also happens to be saturated with leading technology innovators and game development companies; the hardware split is pretty even between SoCal (Orange County, Fountain Valley, LA, Industry) and NorCal (home to Silicon Valley). Game developers mostly hang-out in San Francisco and San Jose.

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We’ve previously toured both regions, with some of our best content focusing on nVidia’s silicon failure analysis lab (San Jose) and Kingston’s automated RAM/SSD manufacturing line. Following Game24 and the GTX 980 launch, we returned to the Los Angeles area for more. In our most recent California trip, we visited NZXT, HyperX, CyberPower, and iBUYPOWER to see their assembly lines and warehouses.

I’ve watched what NZXT offers with their crafted series cases for quite some time now. Besides, it’s always good to see the company release a case that isn’t a Phantom brand. Their lineup of cases keeps growing post-PAX. In the case of the Source 340, we get a case that seems to be a less expensive variant of the H440 with a chassis overhaul. The H440 was a ground-breaking case and was one of the first cases to include a power supply shroud and completely remove the 5.25", bays allowing for more cooling options and a cleaner look. The Source 340 at first glance appears to mimic everything we loved about the H440, but hovers at almost half the price.

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Normally we wait until a product has been benchmarked to talk about it on camera, but we're presently waiting on a driver update for both the ZBOX and NZXT's new CLCs. While we wait for the CAM software update to properly accommodate the X41 & X61 CLCs, let's get a quick hands-on with the new coolers.

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After releasing CAM, which we previewed here, NZXT is back in the hardware world with their Sentry 3 LCD fan controller. The previous model—the Sentry 2—was a great entry-level fan controller, but had some annoyances in the way of cable management. The Sentry 3 has built upon what made its predecessor great and has added features that were needed, taking away a few that were unnecessary. Many times we see companies churn out new products that are just re-packaged versions of something they was already released, but the Sentry 3 thankfully avoids this model.

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In this review, we'll look at NZXT's Sentry 3 specs, its performance and accuracy as a fan controller and temperature reader, and overall build quality.

We called NZXT's H440 enclosure an "innovator" and "the reason we review cases" after benchmarking the product. The H440 ships with a built-in PSU shroud, a side window that obscures the drive bays, and a complete lack of 5.25" external optical drive bays; along with these risks taken by the company, the enclosure uses sound-damping foam and locking thumb screws to mitigate noise and streamline installation.

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The company has now partnered with Razer, in a somewhat shocking turn of events, who are now offering their own "NZXT H440 Designed by Razer." The core specs of the case remain the same, but changes to the aesthetic have been made by Razer.

Since 2006, when Asetek released their more affordable closed-loop coolers (or CLCs), enthusiasts have experimented with using them in creative implementations. One of the more interesting mods was using zip ties to mount CLCs to GPUs. This led to much better cooling compared to stock air coolers, although nVidia's new turbofan looks promising. NZXT recently came out with their G10 bracket which allows users to mount a CLC to their GPU without needing to mod anything. The NZXT G10 includes a VRM fan, backplate, CLC bracket, and screws. Overall, it was a simple implementation of a creative idea.

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Case, power, and cooling manufacturer NZXT announced new products in their liquid cooling (CLC) lineup today at Computex. The company debuted the Kraken X41 and Kraken X61 to members of the media at the Taipei-based computer electronics convention, alongside a new "GRID+" fan controller hub.

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The closed-loop liquid coolers are follow-up products to the Kraken X40 and Kraken X60 that we reviewed last year. The X41 and X61 have kept the same 140mm / 280mm CLC design, but make additions in the form of variable pump speed control and increased radiator thickness. 

Computer component manufacturer NZXT steps away from hardware for a moment to release their first bit of software: meet CAM. CAM is an elegantly designed PC monitoring program that finally does remote system observation right. After using other PC monitoring software like System Mechanic, which overloads their program with a lot of unneeded and non-functional features, CAM delivers with the bare basics for enthusiasts, focusing on everything you should need to monitor your gaming rig.

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NZXT's H440 received an innovation award from us at CES and top-honors in our review of the enclosure. The case is best-known for its built-in PSU shroud, lack of any optical drive mounting, and overall high-quality materials. Originally available in red on black and black on white, the H440 will now be shipping in three new colors: blue, orange, and green with the matte black base coat found in the existing red/black model.

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