GN contributor Patrick Lathan wrote his review of the GX Gaming "Deathtaker" almost exactly one year ago. GX Gaming is a business unit of Genius, a large manufacturer in the East, and was the company's first attempt at breaking into the US market with gaming peripherals. I recently regrouped with Patrick to talk about a new mouse review (stay tuned for that) when he mentioned a couple issues that had arisen with the Deathtaker.

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We do our best to review products extensively (I even take the mice apart) and in a timely manner, so unfortunately it's simply impossible to get more than 1-2 months on a device before we put the review up. Occasionally editors and writers like Patrick will continue to use the mouse going forward, depending on how much they like the particular device; Patrick has about a year of use on the Deathtaker, priced at around $50 MSRP, and recently updated me on its endurance. For reference, I also decided to stick with the GX Gaming Gila that I previously reviewed and have about a year of use on that one, though it's a bit higher grade than the Deathtaker. We'll talk about that one next.

Everyone's making mechanical keyboards lately. Leading keyboard brands like WASD Keyboards, Das Keyboard, and Ducky (also a supplier) have been at it for a while, but some of the incumbents from other corners of the industry want a piece of the peripherals market. If you've been following case and cooling manufacturers for the last few years, it's pretty likely you've noticed that they all latch onto industry trends: Cooler Master, Rosewill, Antec, and others all have some sort of "mobile" line of (let's be honest) supplied trash that they've slapped their stickers onto. Most of these manufacturers, including rising giant Corsair, have also been working to produce gaming peripherals for the last few years. Unlike the mobile offerings, these peripherals have some actual merit and value to them. Thankfully.

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hyperx-cloudTechnically, Kingston's been running its HyperX business unit purely as "HyperX" in recent days; the new Fury RAM doesn't even feature the Kingston branding, and the same goes for the Cloud headset that's scheduled to ship in short order. In speaking with Kingston at PAX East, it was conveyed to us that the HyperX unit is remaining under Kingston, but will be branded independently in its gaming target. The HyperX brand is stronger than ever, we were told, and has grown from a sort-of "side project" at its roots to a major competitor in the gaming hardware market.

 

Logitech’s Proteus Core “tunable gaming mouse” was announced leading into PAX East 2014, but we only just got hands-on with the mouse on Saturday. The company is making big promises with this one – we’ve been told on numerous occasions that the sensor is the best they’ve ever used, the “best on the market,” the fastest, the most accurate, and so forth. We’ll be doing a full tear-down and review in the near future, so hang tight on purchases for that, but let’s talk hardware in the meantime.

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Corsair just announced the release of an updated Vengeance K70 mechanical keyboard. The new options feature Cherry MX Blue and Brown switches in addition to the existing Cherry MX red K70. This is first time the Cherry MX Blue and Brown key switches will be offered for the K70. In case you haven’t had the chance to try them out before, here are the primary differences between the switches:

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Logitech (NASDAQ: LOGI) has thus far had a pristine track-record in our mouse reviews; my review of the G700s sincerely claimed the mouse to be the most comfortable, best gaming mouse I'd ever used. Contributor Patrick Lathan's look at the G500s had similarly-high praise. I've had issues with their headsets in a distant past, but haven't yet had the chance to get hands-on (heads-on?) the newer audio peripherals. In the very least, the company's mice have proven durable and formidable in the marketplace.

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The new Logitech G502 Proteus Core Tunable Gaming Mouse -- yes, that's its name -- lays claim to hosting the first 12,000 DPI sensor in the industry; DPI is often used as a marketing metric, and is so-used here to some extent, but the G502 lacks any undesirable mouse acceleration, smoothing, pixel rounding, and snapping that many high-DPI mice use. These items throw off the predictability and dead-precision that a gamer demands of a high-quality mouse (acceleration is especially noticeable in RTS and FPS games). Seeing Logitech move away from such features while still achieving high speeds is refreshing.

After posting a somewhat lengthy analysis of nVidia's interesting market position right now, I figured it was time for content that's a bit easier to digest (and write). In this edition of our weekend-ly hardware sales round-up, we've got CM Storm's QuickFire mechanical keyboard (MX Brown), a 750W Gold PSU, another M500, and NZXT's Source 210.

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After receiving an influx of peripherals to test (see: gaming mice reviews), we've finally worked our way toward gaming headsets. Headsets are slightly tougher to review than other, more objective components; the subjective nature of audio means that these reviews will be based more upon the user experience than hard numbers.

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In this Plantronics RIG review, we look at the company's new gaming headset + mixer combo package, targeted toward cross-platform versatility and unique mixing use case scenarios.

As the year nears its end and our gaming PC guides get their yearly revamp (see: CPU, video card, & case buying guides), it's time for a new Enthusiast's Holiday Gift Guide. Similar to our "What Next? Post-Build Upgrades" article, this guide explores expansion and upgrade options for your recently-completed PC build. If you've got people who don't know what to buy for your gaming PC, send 'em this way and give them some ideas.

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We'll cover functional and aesthetic upgrade options in this guide. This page will be dedicated to more aesthetic-focused components; page 2 contains video cards, coolers, mechanical keyboards, mice, gaming headsets, and CPUs.

Let's get started with our Gifts for PC Gamers holiday hardware guide!

For at least a year now -- maybe two -- we've kept Plantronics' GameCom 780 headset at the top of our peripheral referral list. It's affordable, now priced firmly at $55, powerful, well-equipped for stream-quality broadcast, and durable.

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As much as we've come to endorse the 780, it's still a mid-range headset; there's an entire spectrum of quality out there, as with all components, and we've yet to explore the top-tier headsets in any officially-published capacity. That changes today, courtesy of SteelSeries' new Siberia Elite headset.

We had a chance to get a hands-on with the new SteelSeries Siberia Elite headset and its accompanying software revamp while at PAX Prime last weekend. Let's hit the specs before further discussion:

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