Nine months after releasing its first episode, Telltale Games’ The Wolf Among Us has concluded its edgy 5-episode canon with Episode 5, Cry Wolf. Bigby Wolf finishes his pursuit of Fabletown’s seediest gangster and pieces together the remaining mysteries surrounding a series of murders and shady characters. Telltale Games’ final episode does a great job of tying up the loose ends while keeping players engaged with well-devised action scenes. The end result seems predictable, but there’s enough freedom for the player to decide how his ending plays out.

twau-ep5-4

This The Wolf Among Us: Episode 5 - Cry Wolf review picks up from where we last left off. You can find our reviews of the previous four episodes here:

Kickstarter projects have flooded the market over the past few years. Multi-million dollar success of titles like Star Citizen have only furthered the torrential downpour of indie titles hoping to realize their game-making dreams. Saturation to such an extent, of course, also brings with it a great burden on consumers when seeking out new titles. Not everyone can deliver, as we've learned, and some projects never even make it to market.

skara-preview1

Skara - The Blade Remains stands as one of the newest additions to Kickstarter, but its arrival isn't without towing force from Unreal Engine 4. What was once a multi-million dollar engine is now available at $20/mo. (with royalties) for developers, and now that the engine has been out for a few months, we're starting to see impending indie games utilizing it.

You'll find our Skara - The Blade Remains preview and unedited gameplay footage below, along with further analysis of mechanics.

Star Citizen stands as one of the most anticipated PC games in recent years. Space-flight simulation has been a part of PC gaming since its very beginnings, but we've scaled-up quite a bit from Galaga to now. In our very first interview with Chris Roberts, CEO & Chairman of Star Citizen's Cloud Imperium Games, we discussed the tremendous focus on graphics and technology for the game. Roberts told us that he wanted something to enjoy on his maxed-out, expensive gaming PC -- something that could make use of SLI and an X-series CPU.

star-citizen-m50-4

After months of WIP screenshots and concept art, we're finally starting to see a few game items receive high-fidelity polish.

Snow White only had to take one bite of an apple to fall under a life-altering spell. Likewise, Telltale Games has been offering its rollercoaster of an adventure series in potent, twisting episodic bites. Telltale’s most recent episode, “In Sheep’s Clothing,” is the smallest bite in size, but it might be the juiciest in the series thus far.

twau4-1

This The Wolf Among Us, Episode 4 - In Sheep's Clothing review & gameplay discussion will pick up from where we last left off. You can find our reviews of the previous three episodes here:

It's been known for a few days that Star Citizen's "Arena Commander" space-flight combat simulation module will be playable on May 29. We first reported on this module from the floor of PAX East, where we interviewed Chris Roberts post-unveil, then again about FPS mechanics, and one more time about Arena Commander.

starcitizen-fire

Star Citizen's Arena Commander module is described in our post here. In short, it is a 'simulation' (within canon) of space-flight combat that is being released primarily for testing purposes. It is important to realize that this is very early alpha (0.8) and will be buggy and broken; the onus is on gamers to report issues they discover. This alpha test will help determine maximum player count, stress test server / back-end stability, and get us some hands-on with the shooting mechanics.

Child of Light has excited me since its announcement not only because it’s developed by Ubisoft Motreal (Assassin’s Creed, Watch Dogs, Far Cry), but also because it’s a departure from the action-oriented gameplay that most AAA publishers deliver. Creative Director Patrick Plourde and writer Jeffrey Yohalem, with whom I spoke at this year’s PAX East, have spearheaded an artistically-inspired Japanese Role-Playing Game (JRPG) with Western elements, like platforming and item-crafting. For the most part, their JPRG rendition feels like a handcrafted, intimately-composed product that visually immerses its audience in an interactive storybook. The story sometimes comes across as fragmented from the gameplay, and customization depth feels limited, but overall, Child of Light offers a beautiful and well-composed adventure worthy of an entire playthrough.

childoflight-1

In this Child of Light review, we'll talk impressions, story, artistic presentation, and the unique utilization of poetry as a central game design element.

There are very few games that get me writhing with anticipation. Even fewer can ruin my work day by sending an email that there is a new update being released. Focusing on work rather than investigating what new changes have been made is an agony of indescribable horror and suffering. Swen Vincke and the team at Larian Studios just put me through that. 

divinity-os-1

If you've had the misfortune of not hearing about Divinity: Original Sin before now, then accept my pity. We've previously reviewed Divinity's 3D RPG counterpart, Divinity II – The Dragon Knight Saga. And we liked it quite a bit.

But Original Sin is completely different from a mechanical angle. 

 

Bethesda Softworks' TES III: Morrowind is responsible for much of my love for bombastic fantasy environments and storylines within games. Morrowind had a sort of charm to it -- and some of this is admittedly nostalgic -- but the game felt big. Sure, having the view distance of bat contributed to that, but the resonance of a fantastical atmosphere truly made the game feel unique: Towering, domesticated silt striders used as a form of transport, airborne jellyfish (Netch), and the groan-inducing shriek of cliff-racers all felt like something out of an R. A. Salvatore novel.

And, for those of you who played Morrowind when it came out, hold onto your olds: It's been nearly 15 years. Ouch.

morrowind-slider

Cloud Imperium Games’ PAX East pre-show saw the unveiling of a (somewhat) functional multiplayer dogfighting module (DFM), as helmed by the game’s visionary and renowned industry veteran Chris Roberts. We were able to get an exclusive video interview in a very quick run-n-gun format after the event to collect Roberts’ thoughts on the somewhat shaky unveil, embedded below; we’ll also be covering the immediate roadmap for the dogfighting module, plans for multi-crew combat, and plans for initial FPS gameplay mechanics (boarding).

star-citizen-croberts

The fan event today collected journalists and monetary backers of Star Citizen, which we’ve written about extensively in three previous interviews:

When Telltale Games announced last Wednesday that it would release Episode 3 of The Wolf Among Us on April 8, I let out a sigh of relief and commented: “Thanks for not leaving me hanging off the cliff for too long!”

twau-ep3-1

You can find our reviews of the previous two episodes here:

We moderate comments on a ~24~48 hour cycle. There will be some delay after submitting a comment.

Advertisement:

  VigLink badge