Some PC parts garner a lot more attention than others: CPUs, GPUs, and SSDs have clear, exciting advancements and benefits that can be directly felt by the user. Some components, like PSUs, don’t get the same amount of coverage or excitement.

Nonetheless, power supplies are a vital part of a PC and a good PSU choice can last throughout multiple PCs, whereas a bad PSU choice could lead to strange issues and can even break other components. In anticipation of the holiday season coming up, we’ve once again compiled a list of ranked PSUs at different price points.

This is GN’s list of best power supplies for gaming PCs in 2016, ranging $45 to $300. Note that some of these power supplies will be on sale during Black Friday and Cyber Monday, so keep an eye on anything that looks appealing for your PC build.

With Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and generally the winter holidays coming up, there’s bound to be a lot of sales and (likely) last minute shopping for gifts. With this in mind, we’ve compiled a list of the best mechanical gaming keyboards at various price points that we at GN have reviewed and recommended for both gaming and general use.

These keyboards go from basic budget keyboards to high-end RGB gaming keyboards, all of which are mechanical. Besides, there’s not much in the way of membrane keyboards lately -- the Logitech G213 and Corsair K55 pretty much round those out.

Here’s the shortlist:

With websites like Newegg and Amazon rolling out “Pre-Black Friday Deals,” it is a good time of the year to purchase memory and storage. For this sales round-up, we’re primarily focusing on Flash-based devices -- namely, memory and SSDs. DDR4 prices seem to get lower and lower as Intel’s Skylake and Broadwell-E chipsets mature, and both Intel’s upcoming Kaby Lake and AMD’s Zen are known to have DDR4 support. The market will complete its switch-over for the enthusiast segment as these platforms roll-out.

It’s a great weekend for buying graphics cards, as AMD is dropping prices in preparation for the release of the GTX 1050. Today is the day those price drops take effect, although third-party manufacturers may drag their feet a bit. Some AIB partners are already offering discounts on the RX 460 and RX 470 cards, especially Sapphire.

SAPPHIRE Radeon RX 460 2GB ($100): MSRP for the RX 460 is now $100, and Sapphire Tech has wasted no time dropping their card’s price to match. This sale only lasts a few more hours, but it’s a safe bet that the price become permanent in the near future, making this a safe buy for budget builds. We reviewed the RX 460 here.

We’re taking a brief break from our hardware facility coverage to bring you this weekend’s sales. End-of-year price cuts continue, as manufacturers try to clear their remaining inventory before the next quarter—which means discounts on usually expensive components.

Given that we've now entered the fourth quarter of the year, the usual “everything must go” plague has infected manufacturers and retailers alike. We've spotted a PowerColor Red Devil RX 480 8GB for $240 (complete with edgy graphics), Fractal Define Nano S mITX (for the opposite aesthetics), and Corsair CX600W PSU.

For years, the de facto standard for PC gaming and consoles was 1920x1080 – even if consoles occasionally struggled to reach it. 1080p monitors have been the only practical choice for gaming for years now, but viability of 1440p-ready hardware for mid-range gaming PCs means that the market for 1440p monitors has become more competitive. Similarly, the 4K monitor market is also getting fairly competitive, but unfortunately mid-range (and even higher-end) GPUs still struggle to run at 4K in many modern games.

While 4K becomes more attainable for the average consumers, 2560x1440 monitors fit the needs of many gamers who want higher resolution than 1080p while still desiring to render – and show – 120+ FPS. With this in mind, we’ve created this buyer’s guide for the best 1440p gaming monitors presently on the market, particularly when accounting for price, high refresh rate, or panel type. Since the primary use case for the monitors in this guide is gaming, we have primarily included G-Sync (covered here) and FreeSync (covered here and here) compatible monitors for users with nVidia and AMD GPUs, respectively.

Best Last-Gen Video Card Deals

in Sales
Sunday, 14 August 2016

New video cards are coming out more quickly than we can write reviews here at Gamers Nexus. The launch of the RX 460, RX 470, RX 480, and GTX 1060 have released a flurry of new options for budget to mid-range gamers (and high-end, if you count the 1070s and 1080s). The new cards have brought down prices for older last-gen video cards, especially 900-series nVidia cards and 300-series AMD cards. In this piece, we’ll show you the best bang for your buck when it comes to last-gen video card purchases – and they aren't even second-hand.

Gamers looking to get a card for $100 to $130 have a few options at the price range. At $110, you could either get a GTX 750 Ti ($110) or opt for AMD’s newly released RX 460. The RX 460 makes more sense than a GTX 750 Ti, at this point, but we do generally recommend a bump up to the next class. That would include the GTX 950 for $125 (after a $15 rebate), outperforming the RX 460 card by 25% in some cases. On the AMD side, the R9 380X was briefly available for $150 before the RX 460 launch, but seems to have risen in price.

Pre-empting the release of the GTX 1060 and our forthcoming content push, this sales post stands as small, easily consumed content for the weekend. We spotted the ASUS VN248-P display for ~$110, a couple of Corsair products (750W PSU, $76 K70), and the ASUS Z97-PRO. Sure -- Z97 is so last-gen, but it's still a good platform for builders sticking to Devil's Canyon.

The RX 480 and GTX 1080/1070 launches have driven down prices of existing video cards. The R9 390X is still a powerful offering in the face of AMD's own RX 480, and nVidia's GTX 980 Ti remains one of the highest performing cards for CUDA-related tasks (at its price). Both are on sale this week, as is a budget Acer laptop.

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