So, you've decided to play Skyrim again. Or perhaps this is the first time. Either way, you've installed the game, played a few minutes, and realized something: wow, this is pretty ugly.

Skyrim isn't exactly a game that has visually aged well. It's more than three years old, was already a bit dated when it came out (Bethesda's four-year development cycle shows), and with gorgeous games like The Witcher 3 having been released this year, Skyrim doesn't really have much to offer on the visual front.

It is, however, a gun that runs on Creation Engine, and it has a development kit with an active community. We have the technology. We can rebuild it.

The upcoming release of Blood Bowl II just got a lot darker (and bit pointier) with the reveal of Dark Elves as a playable race. You can see a preview of their speed and underhanded tricks in the video trailer released by Focus Home Interactive, found below.

All the major manufacturers seem to be playing into the whole “it's hot outside, let's turn that into a sale” gimmick. This week, that means a lot of cooling on sale, including the deprecated Hyper 212 Plus for $20.

After Corsair hyped and released their programmable RGB mechanical keyboard, it seemed everybody and their grandma (who only makes large print keyboards) started coming out with their competing RGB keyboards. Corsair’s early arrival to market and general popularity mean that the Corsair RGB K-series keyboards are primarily recommended while alternatives are ignored or forgotten. So, in order to help those looking for a programmable RGB keyboard, we’ve put together this roundup of reliable solutions.

This RGB LED mechanical keyboard round-up compares budget, mid-range, and high-end keyboards with RGB capabilities.

We've gone through a series of concerning conversations over the past six months. The website has grown. GamersNexus now draws nearing one million pageviews per month through the website alone; YouTube traffic has tripled in a little over a year. This growth is something I firmly attribute to our dedication toward neutral, methodical analysis of software and hardware. Our readers have strongly voiced support of our methods and primary objective to deliver fair content to the industry.

The site has gone from a position of almost no power to one of small, but measurable negotiation positioning. We've got two rooms full of components that are tested on a daily basis, and that's because we've proven we're capable of delivering quality analysis.

We've said it before: Gaming HTPCs are rising in popularity. The viability of a quiet, small form factor gaming PC has never been more pronounced. For the PC builder who wants something for use in the living room with a larger screen – something that can double for movie and TV playback alongside gaming use cases – building a gaming HTPC is a quick, affordable solution. A TV-attached HTPC also bears with it the possibility of cable plan termination, given that most shows are now officially hosted online or on video streaming services.

Gaming, of course, is a major draw for such a build. We make some sacrifices in favor of budget but, in general, most graphically-modest games will go well-played on an APU or low-end dGPU.

This budget gaming PC comes in at less than $500 thanks to a DIY approach; it's easily capable of playing the likes of Skyrim, Fallout, DC Universe, and similar titles at reasonable graphics settings.

Cloud Imperium Games' Star Citizen has several planned differentiators when it comes to space sims. One of the most noteworthy is the promise of ships manned by multiple crew members, expected to be released as a separate “multi-crew module” in the near-ish future. Pilots, co-pilots, gunners, engineers, and other roles will all need to be filled to create a co-operative, team-intensive gameplay experience; it's an ambitious goal, but one that CIG's Chris Roberts feels confident can be achieved.

Our recent trip to CIG's Santa Monica offices already yielded a progress update on the game's “Star Marine” FPS module, addressing concerns of delays, and now we're back with multi-crew. CIG CEO Chris Roberts joined us to discuss multi-crew combat, game engine technology, technical challenges faced with zoning and instancing, and more.

New Shots of EVGA Z170 Boards Reveal Rear I/O

By Published July 20, 2015 at 8:30 am

Z170 is around the corner. The new Intel chipset will succeed Z97, which was launched alongside the Devil’s Canyon and Haswell Refresh CPU lines, and Z87, launched with Haswell. Z170 is expected to offer similar features to Z97, including lane count, and will continue to perform well for overclocking without massive VRMs.

This weekend’s hardware sales round-up features one of Fractal’s best-known cases – the Define R5 – alongside an ASRock Z97 motherboard and Crucial MX200 SSD. The sales aren’t particularly strong this weekend, though we suspect that should change (especially for Z97 motherboards) as Skylake ramps into sales in August.

Star Citizen’s been oscillating in the news cycle lately. The game – now around $80m in funding – has reached a point of industry-wide recognition, ensuring contentious encounters with groups unsupportive of the game’s progress.

We first went deep on Star Citizen’s first-person shooter module, now called “Star Marine,” at PAX East in April of 2014. This was Chris Roberts’ first time explaining (with great detail) the overall vision for FPS and its interaction with other gameplay elements. Following this, an unveil event at PAX Australia showcased some of the FPS module’s progress. In January of 2015, CIG CEO Chris Roberts revealed new information on the persistent universe during PAX South, leading the PAX East 2015 hopes of FPS availability to backers in the March to April timeframe.

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